Chicken · Entree · Side Dish · Turkey

Paleo Chicken Pot Pie

Paleo Chicken Pot Pie

This paleo chicken pot pie can be made with leftover rotisserie chicken, Thanksgiving turkey, or fresh chicken. If you are using fresh chicken just make sure to cook it beforehand.  You can grill it, bake it, pan fry it or any other cooking method you can think of. I happened to make it with leftover Thanksgiving turkey.

Thanksgiving dinner was a total success. This year most of my relatives have gone Paleo and the rest seem to be “Paleo-curious”, so except for the cheese over sliced apples appetizer that I am addicted to, our dinner was 100% Paleo. We had the turkey with the sweet potato stuffing I posted last week, cranberry sauce, asparagus casserole, persimmon pudding, pumpkin spice cookies, pumpkin cranberry bread, cheese and apples and I even made a cashew “cheese” spread.

I have so many things to be thankful for this year. Besides the usual stuff: family, health, food, shelter, friends; this year I am also thankful for my new nephew, the birth of my two youngest babies ( 10 month Lucia and 7 month Edible Harmony), and the over  13,500 new friends that I have found through my new blogging journey. If you are reading this, I thank you for following my blog, sharing my recipes, subscribing to my e-mails, shopping through our affiliate programs, reviewing the recipes and engaging on Edible Harmony’s Facebook page. You make my blogging efforts  worth it!

Ingredients for the crust:

2 cups of almond flour
¾ cups of coconut flour
¼ cup + 1 tbsp of melted coconut oil or grass-fed butter
3 eggs
1 tsp of garlic powder
1-2 tbsp of full fat coconut milk
salt to taste

For the filling:
1 ½ cups of shredded or diced cooked chicken or turkey
1 tbsp of coconut oil or grass-fed butter
½ medium onion, chopped
3 celery stalks sliced
2 diced carrots
1 cup of sliced mushrooms
1 ½ cups of chicken or turkey broth
2 tsp of arrowroot powder
1 tbsp of coconut flour
1 tsp of dry thyme
2 tsp of dry parsley or 1 tbsp of fresh
½ tsp of celery seed powder
salt and pepper to taste

Continue reading “Paleo Chicken Pot Pie”

Sauces and Dips · Side Dish

Paleo Cranberry Sauce

Honey Cranberry Sauce

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I must confess, this was my first time making a cranberry sauce. Having been born and raised in Costa Rica, Thanksgiving is not a tradition I grew up with, so the thought of putting a fruit sauce over some savory turkey next to “wet bread” didn’t initially appeal to me. When we first came to United States we adopted the thanksgiving tradition. Who wouldn’t want an excuse to get together with your loved ones, have a feast and give thanks for all that we’ve got?

I also had never had turkey before I came here, except for turkey sandwich meat and at first it seemed just too dry for my taste, until I once tried a deep-fried turkey… Oh boy! Was it moist and tender! I think it was fried in peanut oil which I am not a fan of and since I didn’t want to spend a fortune buying 5 gallons of coconut oil, I had to perfect the baked turkey recipe.

Back to the cranberry sauce, I now enjoy the sweet and savory contrast. Earlier this fall I created a rosemary fig sauce over pork chops and it has become one of my favorite dishes. As far as the “wet bread” (stuffing), I still can’t get into it. That’s why I created the sweet potato, apple, and cranberry stuffing.

Ingredients:

1 lb of fresh cranberries
½ cup of orange juice, use apple juice for a more traditional flavor
¾ – 1 cup of raw honey
1 tsp of dry ground ginger (optional)
1 cinnamon stick or 1 tsp of cinnamon powder (optional)

Preparation:

  • Rinse and dry the cranberries and discard the ones that are soft or wrinkled
  • In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, bring the orange juice, honey and spices to a boil.
  • Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 5 minutes
  • Add the cranberries and continue to cook for about 12-15 minutes or until most of the cranberries have popped and the sauce has thicken. Do not cook for longer than that or the sauce will not set.
  • Remove the cinnamon stick
  • Serve warm or cold
Paleo Cranberry Sauce

Author: Edible Harmony
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 10
Ingredients
  • 1 lb of fresh cranberries
  • ½ cup of orange juice
  • ¾ – 1 cup of raw honey
  • 1 tsp of dry ground ginger (optional)
  • 1 cinnamon stick or 1 tsp of cinnamon powder (optional)
Instructions
  1. Rinse and dry the cranberries and discard the ones that are soft or wrinkled
  2. In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, bring the orange juice, honey and spices to a boil.
  3. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 5 minutes
  4. Add the cranberries and continue to cook for about 12-15 minutes or until most of the cranberries have popped and the sauce has thicken. Do not cook for longer than that or the sauce will not set.
  5. Remove the cinnamon stick
  6. Serve warm or cold

 

Side Dish

Asparagus Casserole

Paleo thanksgiving casserole

I created this asparagus casserole to serve with our Thanksgiving dinner in place of the usual green bean casserole. This  year I decided to have a full Thanksgiving dinner a whole week earlier, just so that I can share my recipes with you guys in time for the big feast . I actually cooked a 15 lb. turkey just for us. Surprisingly we finished the entire turkey in less than 2 days, I made turkey cucumber sandwiches, turkey pot pie, turkey cucumber cups, I even made turkey fajitas, so I will be posting those recipes soon.

The proportions below were just enough to feed the 2 adults, one toddler, and 1 baby in my family so if a you are hosting a larger gathering, you may need to adjust the amounts. For a simple vegetarian recipe click here.

Ingredients:

1-2 tbsp of butter or non-hydrogenated lard
2 lbs of asparagus spears
1 medium onion, diced
8 ounces of sliced mushrooms
4 slices of nitrate free bacon, chopped
1 ½ cups of chicken broth
3 tbsp of arrowroot powder
1 ½ tsp of dry thyme
1 ½ tsp of garlic powder
Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 380 degrees F.
  • In a medium saucepan sauté the bacon and onions in the butter or lard and cook until the onions start to brown.
  • Dissolve the arrowroot powder in the broth and add the spices.
  • Pour the broth over the onions and continue to cook until the broth starts to thicken
  • Trim about an inch from the bottom of the asparagus and place them in an 8×12 baking dish.
  • Place the mushrooms over the asparagus and pour the broth over them
  • Cover with a layer of parchment paper and a layer of foil
  • Bake for about 40 minutes or until the asparagus are tender
  • Let sit for 5 minutes and serve

Serves 4

For thanksgiving dishes ideas check out  my sage sweet potato hash, or my paleo stuffing

Paleo green bean casserole

 

 

 

Asparagus Casserole

Author: Edible Harmony
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1-2 tbsp of butter or non-hydrogenated lard
  • 2 lbs of asparagus spears
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 8 ounces of sliced mushrooms
  • 4 slices of bacon, chopped
  • 1 ½ cups of chicken broth
  • 3 tbsp of arrowroot powder
  • 1 ½ tsp of dry thyme
  • 1 ½ tsp of garlic powder
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 380 degrees F.
  2. In a medium saucepan sauté the bacon and onions in the butter or lard and cook until the onions start to brown.
  3. Dissolve the arrowroot powder in the broth and add the spices.
  4. Pour the broth over the onions and continue to cook until the broth starts to thicken
  5. Trim about an inch from the bottom of the asparagus and place them in an 8×12 baking dish.
  6. Place the mushrooms over the asparagus and pour the broth over them
  7. Cover with a layer of parchment paper and a layer of foil
  8. Bake for about 40 minutes or until the asparagus are tender
  9. Let sit for 5 minutes and serve
Chicken · Entree · Side Dish · Vegetarian

Sesame Paleo Noodles

Sesame Spaguetti Squash

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Spaghetti squash is so versatile.  I have used it to replace the noodles in Italian dishes, Asian foods, soups, salads and even desserts. These vegetarian Sesame Paleo Noodles will make you wonder why you ever ate regular pasta before.  It  is so light, flavorful and easy to make. For added protein you can also add chopped grilled chicken, beef, shrimp or mushrooms.

I haven’t posted a recipe in a few days. I have been so wrapped up with discussions on proposition 37. First trying to spread the word, then following the polls, and then recovering from the disappointment of it not passing.

Today I feel a little bit more optimistic, we lost one battle but not the war.  We created more awareness. Before this campaign most people didn’t know what a GMO was.  Now even those who voted no, deterred by the unfounded fear of food prices raising, know what a GMO is. It is also true that the bill wasn’t perfect, so  perhaps now they can re-write and improve it. I have hope that other states may pass it. I know it will be a long battle, but maybe as we start to hear more and more about this issue, some companies will start labeling their products as non-GMO. Time will tell but I sure hope I live to see the fall of Monsanto someday.

Ok! Enough bitterness… let’s eat!

Ingredients:

1 medium spaghetti squash (approx. 3 lbs)
3 green onions, sliced
1/3 cup of chopped cilantro
¼  to 1/3 cup of coconut aminos (soy sauce replacement)
2 tbsp of sesame seeds
1 tsp of garlic powder
1 tbsp of coconut oil
1 tbsp of sesame oil
Red pepper flakes to taste
salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

  • Cut the spaghetti squash in half, lengthwise
  • Place both halves face down on baking dish and bake at around 380 F for 45 minutes or until the squash is soft
  • Meanwhile spread the sesame seeds on a cookie tray and bake until they start to brown
  • Using a fork separate the squash strings and scoop them out with a spoon
  • In a large skillet, heat the sesame oil and the coconut oil
  • Add the green onions , cook for a couple of seconds and mix in the spaghetti squash
  • Add the rest of the ingredients and cook for a couple of minutes. Do not overcook it or your squash will get mushy
Appetizer · Side Dish

Sweet Plantain Empanadas

Sweet Plantain Empanadas
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These sweet plantain empanadas sure bring back childhood memories. I have always loved plantains, growing up we often had fried “maduros” (ripe plantains) with our meals, but this occasional treat used to spice up one of my favorite fruits. These are now one of my daughter’s favorite treats as well.

You will need very ripe plantains to make this work. They should be very soft to the touch and the peel mostly black. For those who do not consume dairy, I am also giving you a recipe for a vegan cashew cheese, but you will need to start making the cheese the day before.

Ingredients:

4 very ripe plantains
¼ to ½ cup of tapioca flour
¼ cup of coconut flour
Coconut oil for frying
½ tsp of cumin or cinnamon (optional)
For the filling use shredded mozzarella cheese or cashew cheese (Recipe Below)

Preparation

  • Place unpeeled plantains in a large saucepan and cover with water
  • Bring to a boil over high heat and continue to cook until plantains are very soft and the peel begins to crack and open.
  • Remove from heat and drain.
  • Peel plantains and place in a bowl
  • Remove excess fluid and mash using a fork of potato masher
  • Add the coconut flour and mix
  • Start adding the tapioca flour until the dough is pliable and you can roll them into balls, you can add a pinch of salt and some cumin or a little bit of cinnamon, but I like them plain
  • Make 2 inch balls with the doughSweet Plantain Empanada
  • Place ball over parchment paper or a large Ziploc bag, and start patting it down to make a tortilla about 1/8 inch thick. You can put another piece of parchment paper over the dough to make the flattening part easier.
  • Place about 1 tbsp of cheese in the middle of the patty staying away from the edges.
  • Using the parchment paper under the patty, gently fold the patty in half.
  • Press the edges with your fingers to lock the cheese inside.
  • Heat the oil in a large skillet and pan fry the empanadas over medium heat until golden brown (I like them a little bit charred)
  • Serve and enjoy

For the cashew cheese

Ingredients:

2 cups raw cashews
Cold water enough to cover the cashews by 2 inches
1/3 to 2/3 cup water
2 tbsp of apple cider vinegar
salt to taste

 

  • Place the cashews in a medium bowl. Add the cold water and let soak for 2 hours. Drain.
  • Combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend, scraping down the sides occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until very smooth, you may need to add a little bit more water to get the right consistency. It will look like a thick hummus.
  • Line a medium bowl with several layers of paper towels or an absorbable cloth and pour the cheese over it.
  • Cover and let stand at room temperature for at least  about 24 hours
  • Refrigerate until ready to use or for up to 5 days.

Makes about 10 empanadas

 

Drinks · Health Tips · Side Dish

How to Make Bone Broth

bone broth recipe
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I haven’t even posted this recipe yet and it has already cause a little controversy, created a little anxiousness, and a has stimulated a little bit of curiosity on how to make bone broth. What are its benefits? How is it consumed? What are the origins of this practice?

Almost every culture in history has used bone broth for its flavor, versatility, and amazing nutritional value. The prolonged cooking of bones in water is used to extract minerals and nutrients from the bone and marrow. The resulting broth can be used for making soups, stews, adding moisture to dishes or it can be enjoyed as it. I usually drink a couple cups of it a day, especially during the winter months, to be it is not only nutritious and delicious, but it is also soothing…pure liquid happiness!

Benefits of Bone Broth:

  • Rich in minerals such as calcium, silica, sulphur, magnesium, phosphorous & trace minerals in a highly bioavailable and easily assimilable form.
  • Helps seal and heal the gut lining.
  •  Helpful in treating digestive disorders such as IBS, colitis, leaky gut and even Crohn’s disease.
  • Aids digestion.
  • Natural liver tonic
  • Increases red blood cell and hemoglobin count
  •  Increases serum calcium level
  • Increases the absorption and utilization of calcium.
  •  Prevents and treats myotonia atrophica (muscle wasting)
  •  Helps treating food allergies and maldigestion
  • Helps treating anemia
  • Because it is very rich in calcium it can help with pain and inflammation, cramps, muscle spasms, delusions, depression, insomnia, irritability, hyperactivity, anxiety, palpitations, hypertension, high cholesterol, allergies, brittle nails, periodontal and dental disease, pica, rickets, osteomalacia, osteoporosis and any situation that creates bone loss such as aging, immobilization, postmenopause, and caffeine.

 

How to make bone broth?

It is really easy: start by gathering a couple pounds of bones, ideally you want to use bones with cartilage and bone marrow, beef bones make a richer, tastier broth but you can use chicken bones, pork, turkey or pretty much any edible animal. You can even use the left over bones from a rotisserie chicken or a thanksgiving turkey.

You can roast the bones in the oven first to enhance the flavor of the broth but I typically skip this step. Then you set the bones in a large pot or slow cooker and a cover with water, add a splash of vinegar and soak for a couple of hours (the vinegar is key to extracting the minerals from the bones). Add vegetables, salt and spices of choice, bring the water to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer anywhere from 8 hours to 48 hours. I boil mine for about 24 and since I am going to strain the broth I usually add vegetable peels, cucumber and zucchini ends, bell pepper cores, apple cores, eggshells, beat greens, cilantro or parsley roots and any other “leftovers” I had been accumulating from the preparation of previous meals

Ingredients:

1/2 to 1 lb of grass fed beef knuckle bone cartilage
1 lb of grass fed beef marrow bone (the smaller the better)
4 quarts of water
2 tbsp of apple cider vinegar
10-12 garlic cloves
1 bay leaf
Salt and Pepper to taste
Optional ingredients: celery stalks, onions, vegetable peels, eggshells, apple cores, bell pepper cores, vegetable greens, rosemary, thyme, oregano, etc.

Preparation:

  • Optional Step: Preheat the oven to 400 F and roast the bones until well browned, turning about every 20 minutes.
  •  Transfer bones to a large pot or slow cooker (Crockpot) and add the water and vinegar.
  • Let sit for about 2 hours.
  •  Turn the heat on to high and bring the water to a boil.
  • Reduce the heat to low and simmer the bones for 8 to 24 hours, replenishing the pot with hot water as needed.
  • Strain and drink

The same bones can be used to make a second batch, you must add new vinegar, vegetables and spices.
The broth can be stored in a mason jar in the refrigerator for about 5- days, but if you bring the broth to a boil every couple of days it should last longer, or you can just freeze it.

For bouillon reduce the broth to about 3 cups of liquid, freeze in ice cube trays and dissolve an ice cube or two in hot water as needed

CONTINUAL BROTH:

To have warm and fresh broth available 24/7, keep the bones in the crock pot and always keep it on, replenishing the water and adding new vegetables and spices, depending on how much broth you drink you may have to replace your bones with fresh bones every week or so.

Salads · Side Dish · Vegetarian

Kohlrabi Slaw

Kohlrabi Greens Recipe (Kohlrabi Slaw)
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What happens when a cabbage and a broccoli get married? A kohlrabi!!! A delicious root vegetable that is very rich in vitamin C, just one cup of it has over 100% of your vitamin C daily requirement. The leaves are also edible so I decided to combine both the vegetable and the greens into this Kohlrabi slaw.

Kohlrabi recipe

I stumbled upon this root at my local supermarket and I was very intrigued by it. I love trying new things and I had never seen it before. Without a clue on how to prepare it, I went ahead and bought a few of them.  I was very excited about my new-found rare and exotic vegetable…  I posted a picture of them on Facebook thinking that people were going to be puzzled about it.  To my surprise, I realized that this is a common vegetable in some other areas of the country. I learned a lot about them and I was surprised to find out that people would rather eat this raw, so I kept them raw yet sautéed the greens.

Ingredients:

3 medium kohlrabi julienned
3 kohlrabi greens, chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
1-2 carrots, shredded or julienned
¼ tsp of cumin
¼ cup of lemon juice
¼ cup of olive oil
¾ tsp of raw honey
1 tbsp of coconut oil
salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

  • Using a mandolin slicer or a knife julienne the kohlrabi and carrots
  • Set in a large salad bowl
  • In a large skillet over medium heat sauté the kohlrabi green, minced fresh garlic, cumin and salt with the coconut oil until tender and remove from heat.
  • In a separate bowl, whisk the lemon juice, olive oil, raw honey, salt and pepper
  • Combine everything together and serve.

 

Serves 4-6
This recipe holds great for a day or 2

Entree · Side Dish · Vegetarian

Basic Spaghetti Squash

Paleo Pasta, Grain-free pasta, gluten-free pasta

In worldwide cuisine, there are few items as recognizable and internationally loved as spaghetti.  Unfortunately for folks with gluten, wheat, or other grain sensitivities, as well as those who simply choose a gluten-free, grain-free or paleo diet, spaghetti and other forms of pasta aren’t an option.  With this recipe, fret no more! A fantastic low-carb, low-calorie substitution for pasta, 1 cup of cooked spaghetti squash contains only 42 calories, 0 grams of fat, and many nutrients including folic acid, calcium, iron, potassium, vitamin A, vitamin C and beta carotene.

Before I started on a gluten-free diet I had never even heard about spaghetti squash.  I saw it on a restaurant menu under their gluten-free foods and I was pretty intrigued. The more I asked the waiter about it, the least I understood… it’s called spaghetti, but it’s not pasta? a squash in the shape of noodles? I went ahead and ordered it anyway, I was new to the GF diet and I was already expecting something boring and tasteless.

When it arrived, it didn’t look anything like what I had in mind. It was a half squash with some olive oil a few herbs and some grilled pieces of chicken. How could something so simple taste so good? My next mission was to try to find it and learn how to make it. I called a few stores thinking it was going to be hard to find but to my surprised they all had it. Why hadn’t I ever noticed it before? Because like  most people, I used to think it was healthy and normal to just eat wheat 3+ times a day. Reflecting on this I have to thank my food intolerances for this new healthier person I have become and all the new foods I now eat on a regular basis.

Here is how I make this delicious, paleo-friendly pasta recipe:

Ingredients:

Spaghetti squash
Olive oil
Salt

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 425.
  • Cut the spaghetti squash in half, lengthwise.
  • Scoop out the seeds
  • Place cut side down on a parchment paper lines cookie sheet.
  • Bake until soft, depending on the size of the squash it may take 30 to 60 minutes.
  • Using a fork, separate the strings from the squash and scoop them out with a metal spoon.
  • Transfer to a bowl and remove excess liquid.
  •  Drizzle with olive oil and add salt to taste.
  • Top with your favorite pasta sauce. Tastes great with pesto

Here is another great alternative to a gluten-free, grain-free , paleo pasta noodles.
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Paleo Pasta, Paleo Noodles, grain-free pasta

 

Appetizer · Side Dish

Pan Fried Sweet Plantains


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I shouldn’t really call this a recipe as it is more like an idea for a side dish. I grew up eating them almost daily and they are the easiest dish to make. A plantain looks just like an over-sized banana; if your plantains are still green you can make patacones instead.

Ingredients:

Ripe plantains
Oil for frying (I used coconut oil)

Preparation:

  • Peel plantains; the easiest way to do it is to cut the ends, cut a slit on the peel lengthwise, and remove the peel.
  • Cut plantain in half and slice each half in four lengthwise, you can also just slice it into 1/2 inch rounds.
  • Heat the oil (you only need a couple of tablespoons).
  • Fry each side until golden brown, I actually like them a little on the charred side.
  • Sprinkle cinnamon or cotija cheese (optional) and serve.

 

Appetizer · Side Dish · Vegetarian

Roasted Rosemary Kabocha Squash


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This squash is high in beta carotene, vitamin C, vitamins B1 and B2, and more. Although it is originally from Japan, it’s now grown in the United States, primarily in Florida, California and Colorado, but it is easily adapted to other climates, and it’s available all year round.

Ingredients:

1 medium Kabocha squash (cut into 1″ thick wedges)
1/4 cup olive oil
3 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1/4 cup coconut aminos (soy sauce replacement)
4 cloves fresh garlic (pressed)
1 tbsp ground dried rosemary ( I grind mine a in coffee grinder)
1/2 tsp paprika
1/4 tsp of nutmeg

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven at 375 degrees.
  • In a small bowl mix all the ingredients except the squash.
  • Place the squash in a baking tray
  • Pour the marinade over the squash and rub all sides of each wedge.
  • Arrange wedges so that they do not overlap
  • Bake for about 40 minutes or until soft

 

**Don’t throw away the seeds, you can roast them just like you do  pumpkin seeds